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Video and Audio on MIT OCW

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MIT OCW's Approach to Video and Audio

Each MIT OCW course Web site is developed individually with the participating faculty and instructors. It includes as much of the MIT faculty member's course materials as is available in a digital format, or can be cost-effectively prepared; and is free of Intellectual Property and copyright restrictions. MIT faculty and instructors publish only as much content as they are comfortable having on a Web site that is freely accessible worldwide.

MIT OpenCourseWare is a large scale web publishing initiative whose charge from the MIT faculty is to make the core teaching materials—including syllabi, lecture notes, assignments and exams—from all 1,800 MIT classes freely and openly available on the web.  The materials support a wide range of uses by educators and students at other institutions in addition to providing a resource for independent learning.  Educators use our materials to design courses and programs at their institutions and adopt the course materials for use in their classrooms; students use our site to supplement to materials they receive at their institutions and to study beyond the bounds of their chosen discipline.  Our text-based resources support these uses very effectively, in many cases more effectively than video content would (see /OcwWeb/Global/AboutOCW/evaluation.htm for more information).

We do recognize the value of video to independent learning.  Where possible, we have included pre-existing video in our publication, and we continue to invest in video recordings of foundational courses.  MIT OCW currently has more than 25 courses with full video lectures and over 1,000 hours of video in total. We plan to continue adding a limited number of full video courses to our publication each year. Video, however, remains a supplement to our mission of publishing and updating core teaching materials.  Video is among the most costly types of content to produce and distribute, and including more video would impact the depth and currency of the publication, affecting the many other ways visitors use our site.  Over time, the balance of costs and benefits may shift with respect to video, allowing for the inclusion of more.  At present our focus remains on making the courseware used in all 1,800 classes—our entire curriculum—openly available as a resource to educators and learners around the world.

A key MIT OCW audience is educators, and for them, we are hoping that by providing the syllabus, reading lists and lecture notes, we are offering a chance for them to jumpstart their own pedagogy and improve the way they teach their chosen discipline. While the video lectures for "Course 18.06 — Linear Algebra, Spring 2005," for example, are very easy for people with fast Internet connections to watch, they do not fulfill the mission of MIT OCW.

We do, however, offer complete video and/or audio for the following courses:

Video

3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry, Fall 2004

3.320 Atomistic Computer Modeling of Materials, Spring 2005

3.60 Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials, Fall 2005

5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005

5.112 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005

6.002 Circuits and Electronics, Fall 2000

6.013 / ESD.013J Electromagnetics and Applications, Fall 2005

6.033 Computer Systems Engineering, Spring 2005

6.046J / 18.410J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503), Fall 2005

6.451 Principles of Digital Communication II, Spring 2005

6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion, Spring 2005

6.912 Introduction to Copyright Law, IAP 2006

7.012 Introduction to Biology, Fall 2004

7.014 Introductory Biology, Spring 2005

8.01 Physics I, Fall 1999  

8.02 Electricity and Magnetism, Spring 2002

8.03 Physics III: Vibrations and Waves, Fall 2004

11.969 Workshop on Deliberative Democracy and Dispute Resolution, Summer 2005

16.885J Aircraft Systems Engineering, Fall 2005

18.03 Differential Equations, Spring 2006

18.06 Linear Algebra, Spring 2005

18.085 Mathematical Methods for Engineers I, Fall 2005

18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II, Spring 2006

CMS.930 Media, Education, and the Marketplace, Fall 2001

Audio

2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes, Fall 2004

3.60 Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials, Fall 2005

5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005

5.112 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005

6.046J / 18.410J Introduction to Algorithms (SMA 5503), Fall 2005

6.774 Physics of Microfabrication: Front End Processing, Fall 2004

7.012 Introduction to Biology, Fall 2004

7.013 Introductory Biology, Spring 2006

9.00 Introduction to Psychology, Fall 2004

9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior, Fall 2003

9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins, Spring 2005

9.20 Animal Behavior, Fall 2005

16.885J Aircraft Systems Engineering, Fall 2005

18.086 Mathematical Methods for Engineers II, Spring 2006

ESD.932 Engineering Ethics, Spring 2006

HST.508 Genomics and Computational Biology, Fall 2002

HST.512 Genomic Medicine, Spring 2004

Technical Requirements

RealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files associated with the courses listed on this page. Media player software, such as Quicktime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mp3 files.

Learn how to save the RealPlayer video files  to a disk or to your hard drive.